Tag Archives: Mayonnaise

Wafu Japanese Style Mayonaizu Spread: Product Review

I’m happy to report that I’ve made an awesome new discovery at my local Costco! This review is more about something new and great that about price and value, although as usual, when bought at Costco, the value was there! I’m talking here about the Wafu Japanese-Style Mayonaizu Spread. This was on demo at my local Costco, and I picked up two squeeze bottles of 450 ml each, just under a half-liter, for $6.99, no tax.

I’m a huge fan of traditional Wafu dressing, and when it comes to taste, these spreads are right on. What I enjoy about them is that I can take the wonderful taste of Wafu and apply it to a bunch of places where I couldn’t before, on account of the dressing being too thin. For example, I’ve already tried the Wafu Japanese-Style Mayonaizu Spread on toast – excellent! – in an actual salad, which was delicious, and on humble hot dogs, which tasted like a million bucks after a generous application of Wafu spread!

The Mayonaizu Spread is available at Costco in three different flavors; you get to pick two per order. They are:

  • Sesame – Tastes most like traditional Wafu dressing;
  • Wasabi – Tastes like Wasabi. Quite spicy, and delicious;
  • Spicy – As the name suggests, it’s spicy, but not hot like Wasabi;

Of course, being me, I could not resist the two most spicy versions of this delicious mayonnaise-style spread. I got the Spicy and Wasabi versions, pictured below.

Wafu Wasabi Mayonaizu Japanese Style Spread

Wafu Wasabi Mayonaizu Japanese Style Spread

The Wasabi version of the Mayonaizu spread is quite spicy; definitely not something to give young kids, which is not something I thought about when I bought this. I will buy the milder Sesame version when I’m next at Costco.

Wafu Spicy Mayonaizu Spread

Wafu Spicy Mayonaizu Spread

Since the Spicy Wafu is not as spicy as the Wasabi, I don’t like it as much, but it may go down better with the other members of the family.

When it comes to ingredients, both are almost identical, so I’ll list the ingredients for the Wasabi version:

  • Canola Oil
  • Water
  • Rice Vinegar
  • Pasteurized Frozen Egg Yolk
  • Sugar
  • Modified Corn Starch
  • Sea Sal
  • Spinach Powder
  • Lactic Acid
  • Lemon Juice Concentrate
  • Horseradish Powder
  • Xanthum Gum
  • Citric Acid
  • Potassium Sorbate
  • Sodium Benzoate
  • Wasabi Oil
  • Natural Flavor
  • Mustard Oil
  • Capsicum Oil
  • Calcium Disodium Edta
Wafu Spicy Mayonaizu Japanese Style Spread Ingredients and Nutrition Facts

Wafu Spicy Mayonaizu Japanese Style Spread Ingredients and Nutrition Facts

None of these ingredients are particularly freaky, although there are quite a few stability and conservation agents. Pictured at right are the ingredients for the Spicy Mayonaizu version.

As far as the nutritional information goes, this is pretty standard for a mayonnaise-style spread. (Compare with my Kirkland Signature Real Mayonnaise here) There are quite a few calories per tablespoon, along with plenty of lipids, cholesterol and sodium. I know that it doesn’t look like that much, but seriously, who eats a single tablespoon full? I know I don’t, which in retrospect might help explain my expanding waistline issues.

In closing, a word about the name; I don’t know if ‘Mayonaizu’ is what you call mayonnaise in Japanese. I would be surprised if it was so. Maybe one of my more cultured readers can enlighten me in the comments.

I think it is funny to say ‘mayonaizu’ so I’m going to stick with it.

If you see these products at your local Costco, and you enjoy the taste of Wafu salad dressing, I highly encourage you to give these a try. They are delicious, and I’m not being paid to say so. It must also be said that these products are made right here in Canada, with what I assume are local ingredients (mostly). It’s fun to buy something delicious that is made here, knowing that you help support your local economy.

Kirkland Signature Real Mayonnaise at Costco: Product Review

As my until-recently expanding waistline will be happy to attest to, I’m a big fan of mayonnaise; It is the standard for a lot of my burgers, and we use it a lot in some summer dishes, such as potato and chick pea medleys, macaroni salads, fake crab and many other things. I know it’s not the best for me, but there you have it. Until recently, however, I thought that our big jars of Costco mayonnaise lasted a really long time. It was interesting to write the date I opened the last jar right on the lid so that I could finally quantify my enjoyment, so to speak. It turns out that our last jar of Kirkland Signature Real Mayonnaise didn’t last quite that long! Maybe we’ve been cooking more. Especially burgers.

Kirkland Signature Real Mayonnaise

Kirkland Signature Real Mayonnaise

The standard by which all mayonnaise is judged is, of course, Hellmann’s. We’re talking about commercial here, not home-made. That’s a topic for another day. Now I’m not claiming to be a mayonnaise expert, although I do eat a lot of it, but as far as I can tell, and by going through a whole bunch of huge jars of mayo, is that the Kirkland Signature Real Mayonnaise and the Hellmann’s taste exactly the same. Same taste, same texture, same everything. Just like it came out of the same factory. Hmmm. I’m not saying it did, I don’t know, but I wouldn’t be surprised if it had. The only difference is the price.

The current price for a 1.9 liter jar of Kirkland Signature Real Mayonnaise is $5.49, Canadian currency, no taxes. The going rate for a very similar jar of Hellmann’s is about $7.49 to $7.99, or $2 more. Doesn’t seem like much, but for something that costs less than $10, the difference is huge.

Kirkland Signature Real Mayonnaise Ingredients

Like most Kirkland Signature products, the Real Mayonnaise lives up to its name and doesn’t have too much terrible or unpronounceable ingredients, which is always a relief. Not to say it’s good for you. Here are the ingredients, in order of importance:

  • Canola Oil
  • Liquid Whole Eggs and Liquid Egg Yolk
  • Water
  • Vinegar
  • Salt
  • Sugar
  • Spices
  • Concentrated Lemon Juice
  • Calcium Disodium Edta
  • Citric Acid

The only thing of concern here is the Calcium Disodium EDTA, which is used to prevent air from spoiling the mayonnaise if you leave the jar open for a long time, or just keep it in the fridge for very long. It is, after all, quite a large jar. This chemical compound is quite toxic when consumed in high amounts, but there’s not much of it in the mayo. Still, something to consider.

The Verdict on Real Mayonnaise

Ok, I’ve considered it. I’m still eating the Real Mayonnaise.

Costco claims that this mayonnaise is 100% made with free range eggs, which I guess is true if they print it on the packaging, but I have a hard time imagining all those millions of chickens running around just to supply the eggs for the Kirkland Signature Real Mayonnaise.

Kirkland Signature Real Mayonnaise Nutrition Facts

Kirkland Signature Real Mayonnaise Nutrition Facts

When it comes to nutrition, the Real Mayonnaise is about what you’d expect; 90 calories per tablespoon, which is a lot, but the main ingredients are oil and eggs, so no surprise there, and there is a relatively low amount of saturated fat, which is good. There is, however, some cholesterol, and you should look elsewhere for your proteins.

Overall, pretty good!

The last jar I bought, and which I just finished, was opened on the 4th of March of this year, 2015, and I finished it last night, June 3rd, so it lasted me exactly 91 days. The jar of mayo cost me $5.49, for a total mayonnaise cost of 6 pennies per day, more or less. Considering that I feel like I ate a lot of mayo, and never held back, I consider this a very low cost condiment and an excellent purchase. 

To be fair, even if I had bought the Hellmann’s mayonnaise, the cost for a similar period of time would only have been 8.7 pennies a day, hardly an expense to break the bank. What you really have to consider is when you buy mayonnaise anywhere else than at Costco, which is where the real expenses start piling up, as Costco is easily half the price of other retailers for this product.

What is certain is that I’m going to keep purchasing the Kirkland Signature Real Mayonnaise at Costco, so long as it tastes the same as Hellmann’s, and is cheaper. The few dollars I save there, and on countless other things, more than justify the price of my membership at Costco.