Tag Archives: Kitchen Essentials

Herbes Salees du Bas du Fleuve: Product Review

Having a good variety of condiments and spices at your disposal is one of the greatest ingredients to tasty and easy cooking. While I usually prefer to rely on individual spices rather then blends, as it gives me more leeway, one of the exceptions I make is Les Herbes Salees du Bas du Fleuve. I use it in a variety of recipes, such as my delicious creamy pan-fried salmon. One of the most defining features of Les Herbes Salees, is that, as their name strongly implies (if you speak French) the blend tastes extremely salty.

Les Herbes Salees du Bas du Fleuve

Les Herbes Salees du Bas du Fleuve

Making Herbes Salées is apparently pretty easy; a quick Google search will reveal plenty of recipes, but frankly these are so delicious and inexpensive that I see no point in buying and chopping and dealing with all those different herbs and salt. I buy it, it tastes great, is easy to use just about everywhere and it saves me a bunch of trouble.

Les Herbes Salees du Bas du Fleuve (Ingredients)

Les Herbes Salees du Bas du Fleuve (Ingredients)

Les Herbes Salées can be used just about everywhere, but the packaging recommends using it in soups, gravies, with fish and meat dishes such as pies, roast beef, ground meats, stews and meatloaf, as well as with pasta, rice, omelets and mashed potatoes. In fact, anywhere you’d add salt, consider using these. It’s much tastier and just as salty. Maybe more so.

Les Herbes Salees du Bas du Fleuve (Nutritional Info)

Les Herbes Salees du Bas du Fleuve (Nutritional Info)

As you can see in the picture above, each 15 gram portion contains 880 mg of sodium, which is not that much when you consider how salty this stuff actually is. Here are the ingredients that4 go in this particular brand of Herbes Salées:

  • Celery
  • Onions
  • Salt
  • Carrots
  • Parsnip
  • Parsley
  • Chervil
  • Savory
  • Leek
  • Chives
  • Spinach

Les Herbes Salees du Bas du Fleuve were born from a need to save herbs over the winter months; there are as many recipes for them as they are people making them. A quick internet search will show that much. If you’re interested in making your own, you can follow this recipe, which is wonderful in its absence of details. Also, you’ll need to read French. If enough people show interest, I’ll post a translated version here.

Rodelle Classic Herbes de Provence: Product Review

I’ve been really impressed with the Rodelle products I had the opportunity to buy at Costco, especially the Gourmet Baking Cocoa, which I reviewed a few weeks ago. I was therefore really happy when I saw that my Costco also stocked the Rodelle Classic Herbes de Provence, which is a Gourmet Herb Blend. I really enjoy cooking French food and eating it, so I figured this would be a great addition to my pantry.

Rodelle Classic Herbes de Provence

Rodelle Classic Herbes de Provence

First off, let’s talk about price. This is Costco we’re talking about, so it’s all about the best deal, the best price and the best value. The Rodelle Classic Herbes de Provence comes in a 108 gram container, which is about 3.8 ounces, and costs $7.89 at my local Costco. This comes down to about 2 dollars per ounce, which is not expensive for a gourmet herb blend.

This Rodelle product is Made in the USA, and contains the following ingredients:

  • Thyme
  • Fennel
  • Basil
  • Savory
  • Lavender

I know that some Herbes de Provence blend don’t include Lavender, but I find that it brings a hint of freshness that is quite incomparable, so I like it just like that.

So what can those herbs be used for? Are they used only in traditional French cuisine? Absolutely not! While that’s where they find their roots, les Herbes de Provence have transcended their origins and can be used just about anywhere. Check out this Huffington Post article for some inspiration!

In short, they are great for grilling or roasting meat – particularly awesome with a roast leg of lamb, or shoulder – but are equally at home with seafood and fish, or simply on roasted potatoes. You can even make a really good dip using nothing but Herbes de Provence, sour cream and mayonnaise!

When you’re next at Coscto, make sure you pick up Rodelle’s Classic Herbes de Provence. It’s an easy and affordable way to add hint of la Cote d’Azur to your cooking!

Rodelle Gourmet Baking Cocoa at Costco: Product Review

I’ll be the first to admit it: I’m not the baker in our house. This honor belongs to my wife, so she is much more familiar with baking ingredients than I am. That being said, I have gathered her thoughts about this product, and I can confidently write a product review! I’m talking, of course, of the excellent Rodelle Gourmet Baking Cocoa, which is available in many places, but which we buy at Costco, because it is dirt cheap there, and it helps us maximize our membership and our Executive 2% Cash Back.

Rodelle Gourmet Baking Cocoa

Rodelle Gourmet Baking Cocoa

First, let’s talk about price. This 700 gram container of Rodelle Gourmet Baking Cocoa, when purchased at Costco, costs $8.99. This may not seem significant, but you can buy the exact same thing on Amazon for anywhere from $25 to $35. If you need baking cocoa for cakes, hot chocolate, brownies or anything else where cocoa is needed, then just buying this twice a year can cover the costs of your Costco membership!

Rodelle Gourmet Baking Cocoa Nutrition Facts

Rodelle Gourmet Baking Cocoa Nutrition Facts

My wife uses this cocoa in just about anything, but what she uses it most of all is when making hot chocolate. Using cocoa and sugar, as opposed to a prepared mix, really allows you to control the taste. You can get it as sweet or as bitter as you like it. She likes it bitter, I love it sweet, so we can both get our wish quickly and easily, and for a fraction of the price or prepared hot chocolate.

The baking cocoa is also incredible in brownies and chocolate cakes, which are my wife’s specialty. She doesn’t make them too often, because we would just eat cake until we explode, or eat a whole tray of brownies in one sitting.

Now that I’m saying it like that, and reading over what I wrote, it’s a wonder we’re not both severely overweight.

My dad, who is well into his 70’s and a lifelong fan of decadent chocolate cake, declared a few years ago that my wife made the best chocolate cake he’d ever eaten. It might not sound like a big deal, because you don’t know him, but it is.

When it comes to nutrition, just have a look at the nutrition facts above. I’m not going to bother going through it with a fine-tooth comb, because there is no point.

This is cocoa, not a chocolate bar.

Similarly, the list of ingredients can be summed up in one word: Cocoa. There you have it.

The Rodelle Gourmet Baking Chocolate is not only delicious, it’s also a great deal, if you buy it at Costco. As a bonus, I’m happy to include a picture of the official Rodelle Fudge Brownies recipe, as printed on the side of the cocoa container. Enjoy!

Rodelle Official Fudge Brownies Recipe

Rodelle Official Fudge Brownies Recipe

Planters Smooth Peanut Butter at Costco: Product Review

Hey everyone! I know it’s been a while since I posted a review, but here you have it, better late than never. Lots of stuff going on in my life, which had to take precedence over my blog. But now I’m back, and back in style with some delicious ‘new’ Planters Smooth Peanut Butter. I bought this at Costco a few weeks ago, on the principle that it was a half-dollar cheaper than the Kraft, and I’d never tried it. It’s a new addition at my Costco, although I’m sure it’s been around for a while.

Planter's Smooth Peanut Butter (Costco size)

Planter’s Smooth Peanut Butter (Costco 2-kilogram size)

When it comes to taste, and after a week trial, I’m happy to say to I like it – so far – more than the Kraft, and more than the Skippy, although it’s always a tough to call a ranking on such products without having both side by side for a comparison.

What I found most noticeable, and my wife concurs, is that it tastes less sweet and has a much more pronounced peanut taste, a little reminiscent of natural peanut butter, without the astringent factor.

As far as the ingredients go, while sugar is still in second place, it’s good to see that it’s just regular sugar and not high fructose corn syrup or some other insanely addictive garbage. Here are the ingredients, in decreasing order of appearance:

  • Roasted peanuts
  • Sugar
  • Hydrogenated vegetable oil (cottonseed, soybean and/or rapeseed oil)
  • Salt
  • Fancy molasses
  • Peanut oil

I bought this jar on October 18th, 2015 for $7.49, and it contains 2 kilograms of peanut butter, for a per kilogram price of $3.75, or $1.70 a pound, which is pretty cheap, as you can normally find peanut butter at the supermarket for around $4-5 per 500 grams (pound).

The nutritional facts are completely identical to those of the Kraft Peanut Butter, 90 calories per serving, 12% fat daily value, 4% sugar, et cetera.

Since the nutritional value is the same, I must remain happy that the taste is better, with a richer peanut taste without the dryness that comes with natural peanut butter. You’ll notice that I mostly refer to the bottom half of natural peanut butter containers. The top half is disgustingly oily. I know you’re supposed to mix it, and I do. Still gross.

I’m not so crazy about the Planter’s Smooth Peanut Butter that I now need to have it *all the time*, but as long as it’s the same price or cheaper than the competition, I’ll always pick it. Tastes great, excellent value.

Bick’s Garlic Premium Baby Dill Pickles at Costco: Product Review

A nice short little review for you guys today, for the simple reasons that I’m reviewing one of the simplest, most amazing products ever sold, at least according to my wife, who is pickle-crazy: Bick’s Garlic Premium Baby Dill Pickles, which can be picked up at Costco or at a million other places. Until researching for this review, I had no idea what an absolute great snack pickles are, so there you have it.

Bick's Garlic Premium Baby Dill Pickles

Bick’s Garlic Premium Baby Dill Pickles

One of the first thing I noticed about this product is that besides the fact that pickles are quite solid, and if dry, would certainly be sold by weight, they are here sold by volume. The jar indicates that this is a 2-liter container, and thus contains a total volume of 2 liters, including both the pickles and the liquid and everything else.

This 2-liter jar cost $4.99 at Costco, and is blessedly free of taxes. This price is very much lower than the competition, as a quick Amazon search will tell you. Of course, shipping charges on a jar of pickles are going to be expensive, so better make sure you want them. They are still much cheaper then the brick-and-mortar competition, and Bick’s is a name you can trust for crunchy, tasty pickles. Like Vlasic.

What about the pickles themselves? This is where the review gets short and to the point: they are delicious. They have just the right amount of crunch, just enough garlic to taste without ruining everyone else’s day, and they are not too salty, which is often the problem with pickles, or other marinated, pickled goods.

One thing I find incredible about these pickles is how low calorie they are; sure, the package says “Low Calorie!” but really, how low can you really go?

How about 3 calories per pickle? That’s right, 3. Three, not thirty, not three hundred. Three.

They might as well say zero, because I get the feeling that if you ate only pickles, you would die of hunger, eventually. You’d probably suffer from high blood pressure by that time, too, since every pickle contains 11% of your daily sodium intake, or 270 mg. Don’t look for vitamins or minerals in there, either, because they have simply been omitted.

But damn, they are tasty!

As long as you don’t go overboard, they really are the perfect snack. They taste amazing, have no calories to speak of, and no fat. Just a bit of salt, like any self-respecting snack should.

Since this is an in-depth review, I will include the ingredients that go in making Bick’s Premium Garlic Baby Dill Pickles. Here you go, in order of importance:

  • Cucumbers
  • Water
  • White vinegar
  • Salt
  • Dehydrated garlic
  • Calcium chloride
  • Polysorbate 80
  • Seasonings – I guess this is where the ‘dill’ resides

These pickles are made in the USA, and imported into Canada by Smucker Foods of Canada, from Markham, On.

Despite the fact that the jar is huge, and will take a lot of room in your fridge, these baby dill pickles are too good a deal to pass up. Stock up and make sure you always have them on hand for burgers, grilled cheese sandwiches, or just as a relatively healthy afternoon snack for the kids, or yourselves. I’m going to each one or three right now.

Berthelet Chicken Soup Base at Costco: Product Review

Whatever the level of cooking expertise you assign yourself, you know that having chicken soup base is an absolute requirement for cooking, from the simplest, easiest meal to the fanciest of feasts. This is why it’s important to never run out, or as rarely as possible, and thanks to Costco, this happens very rarely in my household. I buy the Berthelet Chicken Soup Base at Costco, in a 2.25 kilogram container, for $10.99. Needless to say, that’s a lot of chicken soup base, but then again, you can put that stuff in nearly everything.

Berthelet Chicken Soup Base

Berthelet Chicken Soup Base

I use chicken soup base not only for chicken soup, but also to make rice – an absolute must – and for my go-to pasta recipe, the one and only oil and garlic pasta, which interestingly is bland as heck without chicken soup base.

I really love the Berthelet chicken soup base for several reasons. The first, obviously, is the taste. While it is very salty, as it should, it also has a rich, almost sweet aftertaste that I haven’t found it other, lesser brands. Second is the price. At the rate I go through this stuff, it can’t be very expensive.  Fortunately, the size of the Costco bucket means that I’m not buying it every week. Thank god.

In any case, the last container I bought, before the one on my counter right now, I bought for $10.89, and opened it on November 26th, 2014. This means that my container lasted for 273 days, or a mere 3.98 pennies a day, for all the chicken soup base I needed, and I’m never stingy with it.

As far as ingredients go, it’s about what you’d expect. Here are, in order of appearance, the ingredients you’ll find in the Berthelet Chicken Soup base:

  • Salt
  • Dextrose
  • Glucose Solids
  • Corn Starch
  • Chicken Fat
  • Onion Powder
  • Monosodium Glutamate
  • Spice Extractives
  • Ground Turmeric (I assume for color)
  • Dehydrated Parsley
  • Disodium Inosinate
  • Disodium Guanylate

I’m happy to say that there isn’t really anything weird here. Of course, there are some chemicals, but nothing you wouldn’t expect, and nothing too far up the ingredients list. Moreover, the Berthelet Chicken Soup Base is made right here in Canada, in Laval (Québec). I’m not sure if it is available in Costcos everywhere in Canada, but if your Costco doesn’t carry it, make sure you ask for it. It it very affordable, delicious, mostly wholesome (for what it is) and it’s an unavoidable element of any self-respecting kitchen. This one is also low in calories, and gluten-free, if that’s something that you look for.

Artika Aqua Bay Double Kitchen Sink at Costco

Costco seems to be featuring an increasing number of items by designed Artika these days, and from good reason: based on my experience with the Artika Moonraker ceiling light, I would be happy to recommend their products to anyone. My wife and I are considering a kitchen remodel in the near future, and a double sink would fit nicely with our plans. I was therefore very happy to see the new Artika Aqua Bay kitchen sink at my local Costco.

Artika Aqua Bay Kitchen Sink

Artika Aqua Bay Kitchen Sink

My wife loves the double sink, something that is sorely lacking in our kitchen right now. While there is clearly a tap on the picture, the box leaves no doubt for interpretation, as it clearly states that the box contains the following:

  • One double-width sink
  • Two stainless grids, stainless steel, as pictured
  • Two drains and strainer baskets, stainless steel as well
Artika Aqua Bay Kitchen Sink Specs

Artika Aqua Bay Kitchen Sink Specs

The Aqua Bay sink features 10 degrees rounded corners, something we are clearly supposed to be impressed by – they’re nice, but it takes a bit more than that to woo me. What I find significantly more interesting is the 16 gauge stainless steel used in fabricating this sink. This will ensure that the sink feels rock-solid, no matter what you drop in it.

The overall dimensions of this Artika double sink are 31.3″ x 20.5″ x 9″ deep. While the depth is not incredible, this sink has the possibility of being installed under the counter rather than overlapping it, so you could potentially gain a valuable inch of depth there. I know this gain is more visual than anything else, but I’d take it.

The Artika Aqua Bay kitchen sink, is quite stylish, and with its 10 degrees rounded corners everywhere, will give you kitchen a touch of a professional look. It is made by hand rather than stamped, which is a nice touch. Of course, all this stainless steel and sharp design and class and whatnot has a price: the Aqua Bay retails for $329.99 at Costco. That’s hardly inexpensive, but kitchen remodels are expensive, and it always pays to put in quality, either for yourself or simply to enhance your resale value. Moreover, a quick search shows that a similarly-constructed sink, made with the same 16 gauge steel but with a much shoddier design, costs upwards of $570 at Home Depot. Something to think about!

 

Suzie’s Organic Red Palm Oil at Costco: Product Review

While most of my Costco reviews tend to be glowing, this one will not. It will be tempered by sadness and disappointment. I’m a big fan of trying new things, and by and large, this is an attitude that has served me well, both for food and in my life in general. I was happy to find Suzie’s Organic Red Palm Oil at a severe discount at my local Costco; I believe the selling price was $4.97 (maybe a dollar more or less), and the original price was about $15, if memory serves. Thank God I didn’t do like I did with the grilled mushrooms and buy 8 jars!

Suzie's Organic Red Palm Oil

Suzie’s Organic Red Palm Oil

According to Dr. Oz and many other specialists, the wonders of virgin, organic red palm oil cannot be discounted; in fact, red palm oil looks like the Second Coming. That being said, some other people take into account the massive deforestation that takes place to satiate the world’s red palm oil appetite, and it’s not pretty.

Whether you believe the nutritional benefits of red palm oil, or think it’s just another gimmick being pushed by unscrupulous charlatans is up to you. The only thing I can share is that my jar of Suzie’s Organic Red Palm Oil, a product of Ecuador, tasted so disgusting that I threw it away after taking the picture above.

Suzie's Organic Red Palm Oil Nutrition Facts

Suzie’s Organic Red Palm Oil Nutrition Facts

I know that all oils come with an expiration date, even if said date is not printed on the container. The red palm oil I got is so rancid and disgusting I can’t use it for anything.

Now, just to be clear, I’ve never had virgin red palm oil before, except of course in just about every processed meal I’ve ever eaten. But I’ve never had it just like that, a big spoonful to cook in, like margarine.

Imagine my surprise when the time came to start cooking! I put a spoonful in the pan, and waited for it to get hot, only to find a unpleasant odor emanating from the oil! I had no idea what to expect, so I used the oil a few times after that, but I came to the conclusion that at the very least, my jar or Organic Red Palm Oil was super rancid.

I didn’t leave it out in the sun, I stored it according to the specifications on the box, in a cool, dry place, and it was like that the day I brought it back from Costco.

I know that Costco has an incredible return policy, and they would have happily taken it back, but I would have felt bad returning something I used and only paid a few dollars for, so to the garbage it goes. It’s really unfortunate that I got a bad jar; red palm oil seems like something that I would enjoy, and Suzie’s Organic Red Palm Oil, at Costco’s ridiculously low bargain price, seemed like a great deal. If it comes back, and goes on liquidation again, maybe I’ll give it another try, and go for a non-rancid jar this time.

Golden Gate Crystal Margarine at Costco: Product Review

Today I will be reviewing what has just got to be one of the most basic of all kitchen basics, margarine, or ‘oleo’ as the crosswords puzzles would have it. I keep both margarine and butter in the fridge; they may be interchangeable in some instances, but in many ways they are not, and both deserve their place. For the past few years I’ve been purchasing the Golden Gate Crystal Margarine from Costco.

There are a couple of things I like about this margarine. The first, and most important, is the taste. It just tastes right; it has a distinctive margarine taste that is strong without being overpowering, reminiscent of butter, but not quite. I assume here you like margarine, otherwise you’ll be disappointed.

Golden Gate Crystal Margarine at Costco, with Rubbermaid container

Golden Gate Crystal Margarine at Costco, with Rubbermaid container

Without being particularly picky, because I know we’re talking about a bunch of congealed oil here, the Crystal margarine seems relatively healthy; it contains no trans fats, no lactose (obviously), is non-hydrogenated and, in following the fad of the day, contains Omega-3 fatty acids, which have been linked to all sorts of wonderful things, including increased cardio-vascular health and a betterment of your mood, of all things.

Golden Gate Crystal Margarine at Costco, opened

Golden Gate Crystal Margarine at Costco, opened

The second thing I like about Crystal Margarine is the cost effectiveness; a container or 1.36 kilograms, or 3 pounds, of margarine costs as little as $4.99, which is much less than the Becel containers at Costco, which are around 10 bucks for 2 kilos. This price comes down to about 36 cents per hundred grams, which is very acceptable.

If you shop smart, you’ll be able to find the Crystal Margarine on special at your local Costco, and really stock up. When it’s on special, it really is. Last time it was, I bought 2 containers for $2.99 each, which is just about given away, considering the following: THE CONTAINER!

Golden Gate and Rubbermaid seem to be working in lockstep on this one; each Crystal Margarine container is a wonderful, reusable genuine Rubbermaid brand tupperware-style container, which is ideal for work lunches, leftovers and a million other uses around the house; if you were hesitating between different brands of margarine, you should buy this one just because of its container, everything else notwithstanding.

Between the great taste of Golden Gate Crystal Margarine, its relative health benefits, its ridiculously low price and its really cool, reusable Rubbermaid container, switching to it should be a no-brainer. I’ve been buying this for years – and have the mountain of tupperware to prove it – and I’m going to continue, until they screw it up and change the magic recipe. I hope they don’t; I like tupperware.

Last but not least, Golden Gate is a Canadian company, despite its very Californian logo, with offices in both Ontario and Quebec. It’s great to buy local.

UPDATE – April 2016 – There is a recall affecting the Crystal Margarine sold at Costco, and possibly other places. Please visit their website or contact your local Costco for additional information.

Kirkland Signature Real Mayonnaise at Costco: Product Review

As my until-recently expanding waistline will be happy to attest to, I’m a big fan of mayonnaise; It is the standard for a lot of my burgers, and we use it a lot in some summer dishes, such as potato and chick pea medleys, macaroni salads, fake crab and many other things. I know it’s not the best for me, but there you have it. Until recently, however, I thought that our big jars of Costco mayonnaise lasted a really long time. It was interesting to write the date I opened the last jar right on the lid so that I could finally quantify my enjoyment, so to speak. It turns out that our last jar of Kirkland Signature Real Mayonnaise didn’t last quite that long! Maybe we’ve been cooking more. Especially burgers.

Kirkland Signature Real Mayonnaise

Kirkland Signature Real Mayonnaise

The standard by which all mayonnaise is judged is, of course, Hellmann’s. We’re talking about commercial here, not home-made. That’s a topic for another day. Now I’m not claiming to be a mayonnaise expert, although I do eat a lot of it, but as far as I can tell, and by going through a whole bunch of huge jars of mayo, is that the Kirkland Signature Real Mayonnaise and the Hellmann’s taste exactly the same. Same taste, same texture, same everything. Just like it came out of the same factory. Hmmm. I’m not saying it did, I don’t know, but I wouldn’t be surprised if it had. The only difference is the price.

The current price for a 1.9 liter jar of Kirkland Signature Real Mayonnaise is $5.49, Canadian currency, no taxes. The going rate for a very similar jar of Hellmann’s is about $7.49 to $7.99, or $2 more. Doesn’t seem like much, but for something that costs less than $10, the difference is huge.

Kirkland Signature Real Mayonnaise Ingredients

Like most Kirkland Signature products, the Real Mayonnaise lives up to its name and doesn’t have too much terrible or unpronounceable ingredients, which is always a relief. Not to say it’s good for you. Here are the ingredients, in order of importance:

  • Canola Oil
  • Liquid Whole Eggs and Liquid Egg Yolk
  • Water
  • Vinegar
  • Salt
  • Sugar
  • Spices
  • Concentrated Lemon Juice
  • Calcium Disodium Edta
  • Citric Acid

The only thing of concern here is the Calcium Disodium EDTA, which is used to prevent air from spoiling the mayonnaise if you leave the jar open for a long time, or just keep it in the fridge for very long. It is, after all, quite a large jar. This chemical compound is quite toxic when consumed in high amounts, but there’s not much of it in the mayo. Still, something to consider.

The Verdict on Real Mayonnaise

Ok, I’ve considered it. I’m still eating the Real Mayonnaise.

Costco claims that this mayonnaise is 100% made with free range eggs, which I guess is true if they print it on the packaging, but I have a hard time imagining all those millions of chickens running around just to supply the eggs for the Kirkland Signature Real Mayonnaise.

Kirkland Signature Real Mayonnaise Nutrition Facts

Kirkland Signature Real Mayonnaise Nutrition Facts

When it comes to nutrition, the Real Mayonnaise is about what you’d expect; 90 calories per tablespoon, which is a lot, but the main ingredients are oil and eggs, so no surprise there, and there is a relatively low amount of saturated fat, which is good. There is, however, some cholesterol, and you should look elsewhere for your proteins.

Overall, pretty good!

The last jar I bought, and which I just finished, was opened on the 4th of March of this year, 2015, and I finished it last night, June 3rd, so it lasted me exactly 91 days. The jar of mayo cost me $5.49, for a total mayonnaise cost of 6 pennies per day, more or less. Considering that I feel like I ate a lot of mayo, and never held back, I consider this a very low cost condiment and an excellent purchase. 

To be fair, even if I had bought the Hellmann’s mayonnaise, the cost for a similar period of time would only have been 8.7 pennies a day, hardly an expense to break the bank. What you really have to consider is when you buy mayonnaise anywhere else than at Costco, which is where the real expenses start piling up, as Costco is easily half the price of other retailers for this product.

What is certain is that I’m going to keep purchasing the Kirkland Signature Real Mayonnaise at Costco, so long as it tastes the same as Hellmann’s, and is cheaper. The few dollars I save there, and on countless other things, more than justify the price of my membership at Costco.