Tag Archives: Basics

Old Spice Pure Sport Deodorant at Costco: Product Review

Like most men that enjoy not being smelly and gross, I use deodorant on a mostly daily basis. Over the years, I’ve tried just about all types and kinds of deodorants and antiperspirants, and it’s come down to the realization that there is only one type and brand of deodorant that really works for me, and that’s Old Spice Pure Sport, High Endurance Deodorant.

Of course, I buy my Old Spice deodorant at Costco, hence this product review; not withstanding all the awesome stuff you can find at Costco, there’s no denying that this sort of purchases is what Costco is made for. I buy my Old Spice deodorant in packs of 5, for $10.99, which comes down to a mere $2.20 per stick, compared to as much as $5 each when sold individually at the pharmacy.

Old Spice Pure Sport High Endurance Deodorant at Costco: Product Review

Old Spice Pure Sport High Endurance Deodorant at Costco: Product Review

Now, to get to the nitty-gritty details about the Old Spice deodorant; it’s blue, smells nice and unlike antiperspirant, does not prevent you from sweating. It does, however, prevent you from smelling bad, which of course is the name of the game.

Here are the Old Spice Deodorant ingredients:

  • Dipropylene Glycol
  • Water
  • Propylene Glycol
  • Sodium Stearate
  • Fragrance
  • PPG-3 Myristyl Ether
  • Tetrasodium Edta
  • Violet 2, Green 6

It’s worth noting that even though I am quite certain of the spelling of those words – see for yourself on the picture below – most of them make my spellcheck swoon with a passionate desire to correct me. So only normal stuff in there.

Old Spice Pure Sport High Endurance Deodorant Ingredients

Old Spice Pure Sport High Endurance Deodorant Ingredients

I must say that I appreciate the humor in which Old Spice describes itself: “Contains Odor-Fighting “Atomic Robots” that “Shoot Lasers” at your “Stench Monsters” and Replaces them with Frech, Clea,. Masculine “Scent Elves”.” This is awesome.

Now, to the testing portion of this review.

I can say that this product works awesomely for me. I have no way to prove this to you, and of course, everyone is different, so it may not work for you.

That being said, I’ve been using Old Spice Pure Sport High Endurance Deodorant for over 10 years, and it does a great job of destroying my “stench monsters”, and my wife likes the way I smell, so there you go. I put it on in the morning, and it works all day; I rarely if ever have the need to reapply during the day, unless I am doing so extremely strenuous activity, and I avoid that like the plague, so there you have it.

How long does a stick of Old Spice Pure Sport High Endurance deodorant last?

Isn’t that a question that all guys – and gals – have asked themselves at some point? How long will this stick last? You open it one day, use it for a while, then later, the plastic painfully scrapes your armpit, reminding you to throw it out and get another one. But how long does the Old Spice deodorant circle of life last?

Luckily for you, I like to write stuff down, and I’m a stickler for putting on exactly the same number of swipes on both arms every day. Since there are some days in which I will not put on deodorant – sorry baby! – this figure will represent an absolute worst case scenario.

My methodology is as follows: I’ve calculated how long a stick lasts, and counted a minimum number of swipes (both arms); this lets me know how many swipes are in the stick, which for me was 1768 – 68 days, times 26 swipes per day – don’t judge.

Assuming you put on 10 swipes per day, or 5 under each arm, your stick of Old Spice deodorant should last just under 6 months. I put on way more, and my stick lasts just over 2 months.

For me, this comes down to a daily cost for deodorant, and not stinking, of under four pennies. If you stretch out your deodorant as described above, you can lower that to near a single penny a day.

This begs the question: at this price, how come some people still avoid putting some on? Procter & Gamble through all the trouble of making a great product, super affordable, and some still avoid using it. Get with the non-stinking program!

Tested Life Hack: Using Vinegar to Reduce Static in the Dryer

Like a lot of people – most people, I would assume – I’ve been using dryer sheets to get rid of static in the dryer. In addition, these dryer sheets gave my laundry a pleasant, fresh smell. I’ve been using Bounce and the Kirkland Signature equivalent for years.

One of my colleagues brought to my attention the fact that dryer sheets are full of nasty chemicals, and that I’d be better off without them. Courtesy of HealthyLivingHowTo, here’s a list of the disgusting stuff you can expect to find in a typical dryer sheet:

  • Alpha-Terpineol causes central nervous system disorders. Can also cause loss of muscular coordination, central nervous system depression, and headache.
  • Benzyl Alcohol causes central nervous system disorders, headaches, nausea, vomiting, dizziness, central nervous system depression, and, in severe cases, death.
  • Camphor on the US EPA’s Hazardous Waste list. Central nervous system stimulant, causes dizziness, confusion, nausea, twitching muscles, and convulsions.
  • Chloroform on the EPA’s Hazardous Waste list. Neurotoxic and carcinogenic.
  • Ethyl Acetate on the EPA’s Hazardous Waste list. Narcotic. May cause headaches and narcosis (stupor).
  • Linalool causes central nervous system disorders. Narcotic. In studies of animals, it caused ataxic gait (loss of muscular coordination), reduced spontaneous motor activity, and depression.
  • Pentane causes headaches, nausea, vomiting, dizziness, drowsiness, and loss of consciousness. Repeated inhalation of vapours causes central nervous system depression.

None of that is particularly appealing, and most of it is downright scary! After our last box of dryer sheets was done, my wife and I started looking for alternatives.

We tried a ball of foil in the dryer, which sort of worked, except that you’re always looking for said ball of foil. We ended up having little foil balls all over the house, which was kind of annoying, and you don’t want to always be looking for it when you need it.

My colleague, who’s a little bit of a hippie, had told me that you shouldn’t use anything to wash your clothes that you wouldn’t put in your mouth, and told me about using vinegar to replace the laundry detergent. While I wasn’t quite ready for that, research revealed that using a half-cup of vinegar in your laundry would help break down the laundry detergent, and soften your clothes as well. I decided to give it a shot.

What I do is put about half the laundry detergent I used to use, or half of what’s recommended by the company, and about a half cup of vinegar directly on the clothes before starting the washing machine. I let the cycle run its course, then transfer the damp clothes or towels to the dryer.

That’s it. Nothing else to add.

The clothes come out of the dryer completely static-free, without the dryer sheet health hazard, and without relatively effective but incredibly annoying balls of foil.

Allen's Pure White Vinegar at Costco

Allen’s Pure White Vinegar at Costco

I can get about 10 liters of Allen’s Pure White Vinegar at Costco for about 5 dollars. Assuming you don’t use the vinegar for anything else, that means you can get about 80 loads worth of laundry done with it, for a price per load of about 6-7 pennies. It’s more expensive than dryer sheets, for sure – Kirkland Signature ones are about 2 pennies each – but what you spend in dollars you get back in knowing you’re not putting all sort of nasty chemicals on your body.

Of course, please make sure to use only pure white vinegar, not balsamic vinegar, or your clothes may come out a little worse for wear, stained and smelling like a salad.

Using vinegar to reduce static in the dryer works very well, and I’ve been doing it for about a month now. I’m never going back to nasty dryer sheets, and I encourage everyone to do the same and unless you really, really overdo it on the vinegar, your clothes will only smell freshly laundered, not like salt-and-vinegar chips.

Let me know of your experiences in the comments, if you have other alternatives or any other hacks you feel I should try, I look forward to hearing from you and learning new things!

Herbes Salees du Bas du Fleuve: Product Review

Having a good variety of condiments and spices at your disposal is one of the greatest ingredients to tasty and easy cooking. While I usually prefer to rely on individual spices rather then blends, as it gives me more leeway, one of the exceptions I make is Les Herbes Salees du Bas du Fleuve. I use it in a variety of recipes, such as my delicious creamy pan-fried salmon. One of the most defining features of Les Herbes Salees, is that, as their name strongly implies (if you speak French) the blend tastes extremely salty.

Les Herbes Salees du Bas du Fleuve

Les Herbes Salees du Bas du Fleuve

Making Herbes Salées is apparently pretty easy; a quick Google search will reveal plenty of recipes, but frankly these are so delicious and inexpensive that I see no point in buying and chopping and dealing with all those different herbs and salt. I buy it, it tastes great, is easy to use just about everywhere and it saves me a bunch of trouble.

Les Herbes Salees du Bas du Fleuve (Ingredients)

Les Herbes Salees du Bas du Fleuve (Ingredients)

Les Herbes Salées can be used just about everywhere, but the packaging recommends using it in soups, gravies, with fish and meat dishes such as pies, roast beef, ground meats, stews and meatloaf, as well as with pasta, rice, omelets and mashed potatoes. In fact, anywhere you’d add salt, consider using these. It’s much tastier and just as salty. Maybe more so.

Les Herbes Salees du Bas du Fleuve (Nutritional Info)

Les Herbes Salees du Bas du Fleuve (Nutritional Info)

As you can see in the picture above, each 15 gram portion contains 880 mg of sodium, which is not that much when you consider how salty this stuff actually is. Here are the ingredients that4 go in this particular brand of Herbes Salées:

  • Celery
  • Onions
  • Salt
  • Carrots
  • Parsnip
  • Parsley
  • Chervil
  • Savory
  • Leek
  • Chives
  • Spinach

Les Herbes Salees du Bas du Fleuve were born from a need to save herbs over the winter months; there are as many recipes for them as they are people making them. A quick internet search will show that much. If you’re interested in making your own, you can follow this recipe, which is wonderful in its absence of details. Also, you’ll need to read French. If enough people show interest, I’ll post a translated version here.

Kirkland Signature Clear Trash Bags: Product Review

Another beautiful, colorful fall, another millions leaves on my yard, another interminable chore of gathering up said leaves. One of the joys of being a homeowner. Every year, my wife and I – disclaimer: mostly my wife – start the task of raking up the leaves with less than full enthusiasm. We gather them in monster piles, which are fun for the kids. After they’ve had their fun, we shove the leaves in bags and leave them on the side of the road for the Fall Fairy to collect as an offering to ensure her bounty. Either that or the city collects ’em. Whichever is first, I guess.

For that task, I am happy to use Kirkland Signature Clear Trash Bags. They are available at Costco, in one size only, in a box of 60 bags, that cost $12.99. This translates to a per-bag cost of 21.65 cents, or between four and five bags to the dollar. Considering that I need about 20 bags per year to complete the operation, this is a pretty good deal.

Kirkland Signature Clear Trash Bags

Kirkland Signature Clear Trash Bags

Now, on to the bags themselves. They measure 31 inches by 45.5 inches, which is a standard size for garbage bags. They are completely transparent, letting the city (or the Fall Fairy) know that you are not sneaking in some household garbage along with your leaves. Naughty boy.

In terms of resistance, drum liners they are not, but will hold up to leaves and the occasional twigs. Bigger branches will poke through the bag, but it is resilient enough not to tear further if a whole has been poked in it.

The Kirkland Signature Clear Trash Bags feature the ‘Smart Tie Closure’ system, which means that the bags are really easy to tie shut. I don’t understand why every garbage bag doesn’t offer this functionality. It’s not much, but it makes a massive difference in regards to how much you can pack the bag before having to close it, saving me time and money.

Since this is a Kirkland Signature product, you can only get it at Costco, but I honestly don’t understand why you would shop anywhere else for that kind of products. Just buying this kind of stuff – all the essentials, really – at Costco more than pays for your membership.

Rodelle Gourmet Baking Cocoa at Costco: Product Review

I’ll be the first to admit it: I’m not the baker in our house. This honor belongs to my wife, so she is much more familiar with baking ingredients than I am. That being said, I have gathered her thoughts about this product, and I can confidently write a product review! I’m talking, of course, of the excellent Rodelle Gourmet Baking Cocoa, which is available in many places, but which we buy at Costco, because it is dirt cheap there, and it helps us maximize our membership and our Executive 2% Cash Back.

Rodelle Gourmet Baking Cocoa

Rodelle Gourmet Baking Cocoa

First, let’s talk about price. This 700 gram container of Rodelle Gourmet Baking Cocoa, when purchased at Costco, costs $8.99. This may not seem significant, but you can buy the exact same thing on Amazon for anywhere from $25 to $35. If you need baking cocoa for cakes, hot chocolate, brownies or anything else where cocoa is needed, then just buying this twice a year can cover the costs of your Costco membership!

Rodelle Gourmet Baking Cocoa Nutrition Facts

Rodelle Gourmet Baking Cocoa Nutrition Facts

My wife uses this cocoa in just about anything, but what she uses it most of all is when making hot chocolate. Using cocoa and sugar, as opposed to a prepared mix, really allows you to control the taste. You can get it as sweet or as bitter as you like it. She likes it bitter, I love it sweet, so we can both get our wish quickly and easily, and for a fraction of the price or prepared hot chocolate.

The baking cocoa is also incredible in brownies and chocolate cakes, which are my wife’s specialty. She doesn’t make them too often, because we would just eat cake until we explode, or eat a whole tray of brownies in one sitting.

Now that I’m saying it like that, and reading over what I wrote, it’s a wonder we’re not both severely overweight.

My dad, who is well into his 70’s and a lifelong fan of decadent chocolate cake, declared a few years ago that my wife made the best chocolate cake he’d ever eaten. It might not sound like a big deal, because you don’t know him, but it is.

When it comes to nutrition, just have a look at the nutrition facts above. I’m not going to bother going through it with a fine-tooth comb, because there is no point.

This is cocoa, not a chocolate bar.

Similarly, the list of ingredients can be summed up in one word: Cocoa. There you have it.

The Rodelle Gourmet Baking Chocolate is not only delicious, it’s also a great deal, if you buy it at Costco. As a bonus, I’m happy to include a picture of the official Rodelle Fudge Brownies recipe, as printed on the side of the cocoa container. Enjoy!

Rodelle Official Fudge Brownies Recipe

Rodelle Official Fudge Brownies Recipe

Planters Smooth Peanut Butter at Costco: Product Review

Hey everyone! I know it’s been a while since I posted a review, but here you have it, better late than never. Lots of stuff going on in my life, which had to take precedence over my blog. But now I’m back, and back in style with some delicious ‘new’ Planters Smooth Peanut Butter. I bought this at Costco a few weeks ago, on the principle that it was a half-dollar cheaper than the Kraft, and I’d never tried it. It’s a new addition at my Costco, although I’m sure it’s been around for a while.

Planter's Smooth Peanut Butter (Costco size)

Planter’s Smooth Peanut Butter (Costco 2-kilogram size)

When it comes to taste, and after a week trial, I’m happy to say to I like it – so far – more than the Kraft, and more than the Skippy, although it’s always a tough to call a ranking on such products without having both side by side for a comparison.

What I found most noticeable, and my wife concurs, is that it tastes less sweet and has a much more pronounced peanut taste, a little reminiscent of natural peanut butter, without the astringent factor.

As far as the ingredients go, while sugar is still in second place, it’s good to see that it’s just regular sugar and not high fructose corn syrup or some other insanely addictive garbage. Here are the ingredients, in decreasing order of appearance:

  • Roasted peanuts
  • Sugar
  • Hydrogenated vegetable oil (cottonseed, soybean and/or rapeseed oil)
  • Salt
  • Fancy molasses
  • Peanut oil

I bought this jar on October 18th, 2015 for $7.49, and it contains 2 kilograms of peanut butter, for a per kilogram price of $3.75, or $1.70 a pound, which is pretty cheap, as you can normally find peanut butter at the supermarket for around $4-5 per 500 grams (pound).

The nutritional facts are completely identical to those of the Kraft Peanut Butter, 90 calories per serving, 12% fat daily value, 4% sugar, et cetera.

Since the nutritional value is the same, I must remain happy that the taste is better, with a richer peanut taste without the dryness that comes with natural peanut butter. You’ll notice that I mostly refer to the bottom half of natural peanut butter containers. The top half is disgustingly oily. I know you’re supposed to mix it, and I do. Still gross.

I’m not so crazy about the Planter’s Smooth Peanut Butter that I now need to have it *all the time*, but as long as it’s the same price or cheaper than the competition, I’ll always pick it. Tastes great, excellent value.

Bick’s Garlic Premium Baby Dill Pickles at Costco: Product Review

A nice short little review for you guys today, for the simple reasons that I’m reviewing one of the simplest, most amazing products ever sold, at least according to my wife, who is pickle-crazy: Bick’s Garlic Premium Baby Dill Pickles, which can be picked up at Costco or at a million other places. Until researching for this review, I had no idea what an absolute great snack pickles are, so there you have it.

Bick's Garlic Premium Baby Dill Pickles

Bick’s Garlic Premium Baby Dill Pickles

One of the first thing I noticed about this product is that besides the fact that pickles are quite solid, and if dry, would certainly be sold by weight, they are here sold by volume. The jar indicates that this is a 2-liter container, and thus contains a total volume of 2 liters, including both the pickles and the liquid and everything else.

This 2-liter jar cost $4.99 at Costco, and is blessedly free of taxes. This price is very much lower than the competition, as a quick Amazon search will tell you. Of course, shipping charges on a jar of pickles are going to be expensive, so better make sure you want them. They are still much cheaper then the brick-and-mortar competition, and Bick’s is a name you can trust for crunchy, tasty pickles. Like Vlasic.

What about the pickles themselves? This is where the review gets short and to the point: they are delicious. They have just the right amount of crunch, just enough garlic to taste without ruining everyone else’s day, and they are not too salty, which is often the problem with pickles, or other marinated, pickled goods.

One thing I find incredible about these pickles is how low calorie they are; sure, the package says “Low Calorie!” but really, how low can you really go?

How about 3 calories per pickle? That’s right, 3. Three, not thirty, not three hundred. Three.

They might as well say zero, because I get the feeling that if you ate only pickles, you would die of hunger, eventually. You’d probably suffer from high blood pressure by that time, too, since every pickle contains 11% of your daily sodium intake, or 270 mg. Don’t look for vitamins or minerals in there, either, because they have simply been omitted.

But damn, they are tasty!

As long as you don’t go overboard, they really are the perfect snack. They taste amazing, have no calories to speak of, and no fat. Just a bit of salt, like any self-respecting snack should.

Since this is an in-depth review, I will include the ingredients that go in making Bick’s Premium Garlic Baby Dill Pickles. Here you go, in order of importance:

  • Cucumbers
  • Water
  • White vinegar
  • Salt
  • Dehydrated garlic
  • Calcium chloride
  • Polysorbate 80
  • Seasonings – I guess this is where the ‘dill’ resides

These pickles are made in the USA, and imported into Canada by Smucker Foods of Canada, from Markham, On.

Despite the fact that the jar is huge, and will take a lot of room in your fridge, these baby dill pickles are too good a deal to pass up. Stock up and make sure you always have them on hand for burgers, grilled cheese sandwiches, or just as a relatively healthy afternoon snack for the kids, or yourselves. I’m going to each one or three right now.

Softsoap Soothing Aloe Vera Moisturizing Hand Soap at Costco: Product Review

I’m actually excited about writing this review, because the size of these jugs of soap is so massive that I don’t think I’ll get the chance for another couple of years! Okay, maybe *excited* is too strong a term for hand soap, but you know what I mean. Buying things like these is the real essence of Costco savings, and why I try to shop there as much as I can. I did a relatively large Costco order the other day, and it seemed like the right time to stock up on hand soap, as our supplies at home were depleted. I got the Softsoap Soothing Aloe Vera Moisturizing Hand Soap, in not one, but two massive, 2.36 liter jugs, for only $11.49, plus applicable taxes.

Softsoap Soothing Aloe Vera Moisturizing Hand Soap

Softsoap Soothing Aloe Vera Moisturizing Hand Soap

Now I don’t need to tell you that this is a bunch of soap. Combined, these two jugs represent almost 5 liters of hand soap, which is quite a bit more than a gallon, imperial or otherwise. The little dispenser bottle I fill up contains 340 ml, which means that I can refill it almost 14 times before running out. This means that each refill costs me about 83 cents. If you compare that with buying a new dispenser at the pharmacy, like countless people do, every time they need more hand soap, you’ll realize that the savings are incredible, in all likelihood in the range of 75% to 90%, depending on the specials in your area.

But what about the soap itself? Is it any good? Well, it washes my hands without drying them out, and is certainly appropriate for all but the most compulsive hand-washer. I wash my hands an appropriate number of times during the day (without going into details), and have never experienced dry excessively dry hands, except maybe for a few days in winter. I’m certain that you could find hand soap that is marginally better than the Soaftsoap with Aloe Vera, but not at this price, that’s for sure.

Here are the ingredients of the Softsoap Soothing Aloe Vera Moisturizing Hand Soap, in decreasing order:

  • Aqua (that’s water, with a fancier name)
  • Sodium C14-16 Olefin Sulfonate
  • Laureth-3
  • Cocamidopropyl Betaine
  • Glycol Stearate
  • Sodium Chloride
  • DMDM Hydantoin
  • Perfume
  • Polyquaternium-7
  • PEG-18 Glyceryl Oleate/Cocoate
  • Aloe Barbadensis Leaf Juice (that’s the Aloe Vera)
  • Citric Acid
  • Tetrasodium EDTA, Glycerin
  • Poloxamer 124
  • Hydrolyzed Silk

As you can see, the list is heavy with chemicals and unpronounceable ingredients, but that doesn’t mean much. This is hand soap, not chicken soup. You’ll notice, however, that the Aloe Vera, which features prominently in the name of the product, is quite far down the ingredients list. There’s not that much in there, and the Softsoap hand soap relies partly on hydrolyzed silk for its silky, smooth feel. This hand soap is manufactured and distributed by Colgate-Palmolive.

In closing, I’ll mention something that is often overlooked in reviews such as these: the containers themselves. They are made of recyclable plastic, and are easy to squeeze, but not *too* easy. You don’t want to make a mess when you refill your little bottles. They are easy to grasp and hold, and the lid easily snaps open and shut (see picture), making for a convenient pour. Overall, I must say that I’m quite happy with my Softsoap Soothing Aloe Vera Moiturizing Hand Soap, on all levels: the price is right, the quantity convenient, the soap cleans and the containers are recyclable and easy to use. Five stars. So far I’m two on two with my Softsoap products!

Berthelet Chicken Soup Base at Costco: Product Review

Whatever the level of cooking expertise you assign yourself, you know that having chicken soup base is an absolute requirement for cooking, from the simplest, easiest meal to the fanciest of feasts. This is why it’s important to never run out, or as rarely as possible, and thanks to Costco, this happens very rarely in my household. I buy the Berthelet Chicken Soup Base at Costco, in a 2.25 kilogram container, for $10.99. Needless to say, that’s a lot of chicken soup base, but then again, you can put that stuff in nearly everything.

Berthelet Chicken Soup Base

Berthelet Chicken Soup Base

I use chicken soup base not only for chicken soup, but also to make rice – an absolute must – and for my go-to pasta recipe, the one and only oil and garlic pasta, which interestingly is bland as heck without chicken soup base.

I really love the Berthelet chicken soup base for several reasons. The first, obviously, is the taste. While it is very salty, as it should, it also has a rich, almost sweet aftertaste that I haven’t found it other, lesser brands. Second is the price. At the rate I go through this stuff, it can’t be very expensive.  Fortunately, the size of the Costco bucket means that I’m not buying it every week. Thank god.

In any case, the last container I bought, before the one on my counter right now, I bought for $10.89, and opened it on November 26th, 2014. This means that my container lasted for 273 days, or a mere 3.98 pennies a day, for all the chicken soup base I needed, and I’m never stingy with it.

As far as ingredients go, it’s about what you’d expect. Here are, in order of appearance, the ingredients you’ll find in the Berthelet Chicken Soup base:

  • Salt
  • Dextrose
  • Glucose Solids
  • Corn Starch
  • Chicken Fat
  • Onion Powder
  • Monosodium Glutamate
  • Spice Extractives
  • Ground Turmeric (I assume for color)
  • Dehydrated Parsley
  • Disodium Inosinate
  • Disodium Guanylate

I’m happy to say that there isn’t really anything weird here. Of course, there are some chemicals, but nothing you wouldn’t expect, and nothing too far up the ingredients list. Moreover, the Berthelet Chicken Soup Base is made right here in Canada, in Laval (Québec). I’m not sure if it is available in Costcos everywhere in Canada, but if your Costco doesn’t carry it, make sure you ask for it. It it very affordable, delicious, mostly wholesome (for what it is) and it’s an unavoidable element of any self-respecting kitchen. This one is also low in calories, and gluten-free, if that’s something that you look for.

Suzie’s Organic Red Palm Oil at Costco: Product Review

While most of my Costco reviews tend to be glowing, this one will not. It will be tempered by sadness and disappointment. I’m a big fan of trying new things, and by and large, this is an attitude that has served me well, both for food and in my life in general. I was happy to find Suzie’s Organic Red Palm Oil at a severe discount at my local Costco; I believe the selling price was $4.97 (maybe a dollar more or less), and the original price was about $15, if memory serves. Thank God I didn’t do like I did with the grilled mushrooms and buy 8 jars!

Suzie's Organic Red Palm Oil

Suzie’s Organic Red Palm Oil

According to Dr. Oz and many other specialists, the wonders of virgin, organic red palm oil cannot be discounted; in fact, red palm oil looks like the Second Coming. That being said, some other people take into account the massive deforestation that takes place to satiate the world’s red palm oil appetite, and it’s not pretty.

Whether you believe the nutritional benefits of red palm oil, or think it’s just another gimmick being pushed by unscrupulous charlatans is up to you. The only thing I can share is that my jar of Suzie’s Organic Red Palm Oil, a product of Ecuador, tasted so disgusting that I threw it away after taking the picture above.

Suzie's Organic Red Palm Oil Nutrition Facts

Suzie’s Organic Red Palm Oil Nutrition Facts

I know that all oils come with an expiration date, even if said date is not printed on the container. The red palm oil I got is so rancid and disgusting I can’t use it for anything.

Now, just to be clear, I’ve never had virgin red palm oil before, except of course in just about every processed meal I’ve ever eaten. But I’ve never had it just like that, a big spoonful to cook in, like margarine.

Imagine my surprise when the time came to start cooking! I put a spoonful in the pan, and waited for it to get hot, only to find a unpleasant odor emanating from the oil! I had no idea what to expect, so I used the oil a few times after that, but I came to the conclusion that at the very least, my jar or Organic Red Palm Oil was super rancid.

I didn’t leave it out in the sun, I stored it according to the specifications on the box, in a cool, dry place, and it was like that the day I brought it back from Costco.

I know that Costco has an incredible return policy, and they would have happily taken it back, but I would have felt bad returning something I used and only paid a few dollars for, so to the garbage it goes. It’s really unfortunate that I got a bad jar; red palm oil seems like something that I would enjoy, and Suzie’s Organic Red Palm Oil, at Costco’s ridiculously low bargain price, seemed like a great deal. If it comes back, and goes on liquidation again, maybe I’ll give it another try, and go for a non-rancid jar this time.